Mariah Rigg
Mosaic

Mariah Rigg - Mosaic

Fiction
Mariah Rigg is a writer from Honolulu, Hawai`i. She has an MFA from the University of Oregon. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in The Cincinnati Review, Puerto del Sol, and Carve.… Read more »
Evan Brooke
Thanatosis

Evan Brooke - Thanatosis

Fiction
Evan Brooke has an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Threepenny Review, The Northwest Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, and elsewhere. She… Read more »
Nicholas Otte
The Wave Rule

Nicholas Otte - The Wave Rule

Fiction
Nicholas Otte’s stories and essays have appeared in Words Without Borders, Promethean, The Alternative, and elsewhere. His short story “Bird Versus Glass” was the winner of the Winter 2020… Read more »
Ross McCleary
Unsatisfied

Ross McCleary - Unsatisfied

Fiction
Ross McCleary is from Edinburgh, Scotland. His work has appeared in Litro, Structo, 404 Ink, and Extra Teeth. In 2019, he won a New Writer’s Award for Fiction from the Scottish Book Trust. The same… Read more »

Mosaic

Mariah Rigg

The sink clogs whenever my father-in-law, Clyde, comes to visit. He flies in each year at the end of December, staying in our first-floor bedroom with the en suite because of his bad knee. My husband, Keone, works overtime for extra money; the holidays are busy, he tells me. He always does this when his father is in town. He leaves me. Without him, Lily, my stepdaughter, and I are tasked with entertaining Clyde. If it were just Lily and me, it would be lovely. But with Clyde around everything feels wrapped up and boxed in, like I’m a present waiting to be ripped open, sitting under the tree.

I’ve told Clyde not to put eggshells down the drain, but he’s done so anyway. He’s making fried rice for lunch, Lily’s favorite. She’s happy, which makes me happy, but between the bacon grease and the eggshells, our sink overflows. Then the downstairs toilet stops flushing. I think of calling Keone, but instead dial the plumber.

“I can be there in a few hours,” the plumber says, and I sigh, okay.

Lily hunches over the kitchen table as she eats. She is chubby and knows it, already self-conscious. She is six.… Read more »