Kelley J. P. Lindberg
A Sail of Ash

Kelley J. P. Lindberg - A Sail of Ash

Fiction
When Colorado-based freelance writer Kelley J. P. Lindberg isn’t writing, reading, hiking, or sailing, she’s traveling as far and as often as she can. If there’s still time left over, she blogs… Read more »
Yunya Yang
Heritage

Yunya Yang - Heritage

Fiction
Yunya Yang was born and raised in Central China and moved to the US when she was eighteen. Her work appears or is forthcoming in Epiphany, Hobart, and Gulf Coast, among others. She currently serves as… Read more »
Seher Fatema Vora
No God for Spilled Ink

Seher Fatema Vora - No God for Spilled Ink

Fiction
Seher Fatema Vora is a Pakistani American editor and writer. She has worked as an editor for academic and news publications, and recently shifted her focus to fiction. Seher holds an MA in… Read more »
Chido Muchemwa
Paradise

Chido Muchemwa - Paradise

Fiction
Chido Muchemwa is a Zimbabwean writer currently living in Canada. Her work has appeared in the Bacopa Literary Review, Humber Literary Review, Tincture Journal, and Apogee. She has been shortlisted… Read more »
Vishwas R. Gaitonde
The Saint

Vishwas R. Gaitonde - The Saint

Fiction
Photo credit: C. Anthony Huber Vishwas R. Gaitonde spent his formative years in India and now resides in the United States. He has been published in literary magazines such as The Iowa Review,… Read more »

The Saint

Vishwas R. Gaitonde

Nobody remembered when the saint first appeared at the temple. Everybody agreed that it was within the last six months or thereabouts; no one had set eyes on him before that. He materialized so silently and mysteriously that they could not pin a date on when it had happened. But he soon became a familiar sight at the temple: a dark young man sitting cross-legged, his back lightly leaning against one of the pillars, the hint of a beatific smile playing on his face. Tears glimmered in his eyes as he listened to the pujaris chanting mantras as they waved oil lamps in gentle, circular motions in front of the deity.

The sanctum sanctorum of the temple was a small windowless room with the coal-black statue of the deity occupying most of the space. Worshippers could view the deity through the room’s single large door from a long passageway in front of it. Two steel railings ran along the length of the passage, creating an aisle in the middle. The devout lined up behind the railing on either side, leaning over and craning their necks to view the deity and witness the puja ceremony, at the end of which the… Read more »