Sonya Huber
Glass Beads

Sonya Huber - Glass Beads

Creative Nonfiction
Sonya Huber is the author of two books of creative nonfiction, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir (2010), finalist for… Read more »
Leslie Jill Patterson
Mirage

Leslie Jill Patterson - Mirage

Creative Nonfiction
Jill Patterson teaches in the creative writing program at Texas Tech University. Her prose and poetry have appeared most recently… Read more »
Susan Gabrielle
Newton's Third Law

Susan Gabrielle - Newton's Third Law

Creative Nonfiction
Susan Gabrielle’s work has been published or is forthcoming in The Christian Science Monitor, Heyday, TheBatShat, San Francisco Peace and… Read more »
Leslie Tucker
Packing Heat

Leslie Tucker - Packing Heat

Creative Nonfiction
Leslie Tucker, a Detroit escapee, lives on the side of a South Carolina mountain and refuses to divulge its exact… Read more »
James Valvis
Samaritan

James Valvis - Samaritan

Creative Nonfiction
James Valvis is the author of How to Say Goodbye (Aortic Books, 2011). His writing can be found in many… Read more »

Mirage

Leslie Jill Patterson

People in Ouray, Colorado, said they couldn’t survive another winter like 2008. Usually, in the San Juan Mountains, the sun shines 285 days a year, fleecy in winter and razor-edged in summer, but in 2008, record snowfalls smothered the sky and piled snow fifteen feet deep in town where it’s usually only three. Avalanche slides that hadn’t run in almost a century brought down muscular 100-year-old trees. Come that spring, the slopes resembled battlefields, the pines like bodies zigzagged on top of one another and spilling across the highway. The people were bleary-eyed and pale, exhausted from shoveling snow, the weight of chains and snow tires, the millstone of loneliness and peril.

A mere four years later, the winter of 2012 has been dry, merciless in the other extreme. I don’t have a cabin there anymore, and only a few acquaintances, but I watch the news, check weather reports online, hear things. January, they say, was sedate, the “gift” of a mild winter. People went to movies, ate out, drove to neighboring towns at their leisure, a real bed of roses. But by March, winter had failed them altogether, and April barged in feverish as June, triggering… Read more »