Kate Leary
Delivery Boy

Kate Leary - Delivery Boy

Fiction
Kate Leary’s work has appeared in Word Riot, Harpur Palate, and Night Train, and she was a fiction editor of… Read more »
Robert Earle
How Chung’s Sister Got Her Name

Robert Earle - How Chung’s Sister Got Her Name

Fiction
Robert Earle has published more than forty stories across the U.S. and Canada in journals such as Mississippi Review, The… Read more »
John Byrne
I’m Going To Let You Go, Okay?

John Byrne - I’m Going To Let You Go, Okay?

Fiction
John Byrne is the founder and chairman of Raw Story, a political news website, and has previously written for The… Read more »
Matthew Neill Null
Natural Resources

Matthew Neill Null - Natural Resources

Fiction
Matthew Neill Null is a writer from West Virginia and a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His short fiction… Read more »
Margarite Landry
Out of Egypt

Margarite Landry - Out of Egypt

Fiction
Margarite Landry’s short stories have appeared in Nimrod, Bellingham Review, Tampa Review, Provincetown Arts, 2012 Wordstock 10 Anthology (first prize),… Read more »
Brandon Davis Jennings
Spectres

Brandon Davis Jennings - Spectres

Fiction
Brandon Davis Jennings is an Iraq War veteran from West Virginia. He received his MFA in Fiction from Bowling Green… Read more »
Rachel Lyon
The Installation

Rachel Lyon - The Installation

Fiction
Rachel Lyon received her MFA in creative writing at Indiana University and her BA at Princeton. She has been, among… Read more »
Emma Gabrielle Silverman
The Star of David

Emma Gabrielle Silverman - The Star of David

Fiction
Emma Gabrielle Silverman lives in Ithaca, New York where she is a yoga instructor at Cornell University. She has previously… Read more »
Daniel O’Malley
Uncle

Daniel O’Malley - Uncle

Fiction
Daniel O’Malley grew up in Cedar Hill, Missouri, and currently lives in Huntington, West Virginia. His fiction has appeared in… Read more »

The Star of David

Emma Gabrielle Silverman

Although it looked like his nose had been broken many times, he moved so quickly it never had. His mother, who loved him, would say, “Abi, my baby, he looks like an eagle, no?” There was something avian about him. Abraham Katcher’s hair was perpetually slicked back with pomade. The pomade, however, was often forgotten: his hands would fly up to smooth his hair back, only to retreat to his sides when they met the greased-up hairline. His eyebrows resembled an unruly plumage. They met in the center, exploring north in tiny, renegade hairs that spread across the lower forehead. Pointy chin, smaller mouth—nothing exceptional except that, like most birds, he was born handsome and austere and would remain so his entire life.

So, yes, the nose was larger (and crooked), the eyebrows explosive (his mother would say, “expressive”), but Abraham, Abi, was a good looking young man. He wasn’t known for his looks, though. Abi Katcher was the best boxer his neighborhood had ever seen, and the best Jewish boxer they ever would.

His fans who lived on New York’s Lower East Side, and they were plentiful, could be forgiven for gossiping about him. Abi was famous… Read more »